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Thank you for visiting my blog!

This blog is used to share information that I find about the families that I am researching. To see these family names click on the tab above. Please feel free to contribute your stories or research and make comments, corrections, and ask questions.

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My posts can be accessed by the date posted from the column on the right. Blog posts containing specific surnames can be found by clicking on the names in the left column.

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Friday, July 31, 2015

Friday's Photo: An Unknown Couple




Alice Amanda Bryan married
her cousin, John R. Regan
This photo belongs to one of my Bryan/Hammett cousins - a descendant of John and Alice Bryan Hammett. There are no markings on this photo and the only way to identify the subjects is to find someone with the same photo.

The man has a short, white collar and he doesn't appear to have on a tie. The woman has large, puffy sleeves and a bar pin. The clothing styles lead me to believe that the photo dates about 1890.  I am not an expert in this area so if you believe that I am incorrect about the date, please leave a comment below or contact me via email.

Elizabeth Regan Bryan left
much family in Robeson County,
North Carolina. 
It has always been assumed that at least one of the subjects is a Bryan or Hammett. But, it's not that simple. If the picture was passed down to Alice or John, it could be descendants from any number of families - Hammetts, Bryans, Albrittons, Regans and more. 

There is much documentation that shows these families sent letters and photographs to family members throughout the country. And, I am just assuming that the photo is that of family - I could be wrong.


Robert E. Hammett was from
St. Mary's County in Maryland
and corresponded with that family
while living in Natchitoches Parish.
 
John Hammett and Alice Bryan were first cousins. John was the son of Dorothy Bryan and Robert Hammett of Natchitoches Parish in Louisiana. Alice was the daughter of Terrell Bryan and Harriet Albritton of Bienville Parish and later Erath County, Texas.  

Terrell and Dorothy Bryan were children of Reddick Bryan and Elizabeth Regan Bryan. Reddick of Martin County, NC and Elizabeth of Robeson County, NC also lived in Georgia before settling in Bienville Parish.
  
Why am I posting this unknown couple on my blog? You might have this photo in your family bible along with their names. OR, maybe find this post five years from now and have the identical photo - hopefully with names. Many of my family photos were identified this way.

Watch this blog for more posts about my family. Like my Facebook Page to be notified each time that I post to my blog.


Diana

© 2015

Sources

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.


Family photographs from the collection of Judy McAlister. Used with permission.

"Men's Clothing." - 1850s. Web. 2 July 2015. 
<http://www.uvm.edu/landscape/dating/clothing_and_hair/1850s_clothing_men.php>.

Taylor, Maureen Alice. Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries. Cincinnati: Family Tree, 2013. Print.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

From the Files of Marguerite Cook Clark:Alice Davis Regan




These three items were found in the files and albums kept by Marguerite Cook Clark. Marguerite's mother, Maggie Martin Cook, labeled both photos. 

Alice Mae Davis was the youngest daughter of Henry Jefferson Davis and Eliza C. Wimberly.  She was born on June 17, 1884 and her father died of pneumonia just six month's after her birth.  


Maggie Cook and Alice Davis 
Alice's family remained in the home built by her father. The family lived in very close proximity to Maggie Martin's family as well my great-grandfather's brother, Joseph Bryan, and his wife, Sarah Wimberly, half-sister to Alice's mother. 

On December 6, 1903, Alice married Joe Bryant Regan, son of Reddick Bryan Regan and Sarah Elizabeth Gardner. Joe was a grandson of John Regan and a great-grandson of Elizabeth S. Regan Bryan. 



Alice and Joe lived in the Lee Community when they were first married and in 1919 purchased the Stewart Hotel and established the Regan Hotel. They sold the hotel in 1938 and built a home on the edge of town where Joe ran a small dairy. 

Alice and Joe raised three daughters and three of their grandchildren. 

Alice died on December 6, 1958 and Joe died a few months later on April 18, 1959. They are both buried in the Providence Cemetery in Ringgold, Bienville Parish, Louisiana. 


Diana

© 2015



Sources

"Alice M Davis in the 1900 United States Federal Census." Web. 29 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=5897301&db=1900usfedcen&indiv=try>.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014 and September 14, 2014. Used with permission.

Wimberly, Vera. Wimberly Family History: Ancestors, Relatives, and Descendants of William Wimberly, Pioneer from Georgia to Louisiana, 1837. Houston, Tex.: D. Armstrong, 1979. Print.

Friday, July 24, 2015

Friday's Photo: Grandma Lived at The Webster in NYC



My grandmother - Edith Giddens, center, with friend Marge on the left and Cleo Hauser on the right.
This photo was taken on the rooftop patio at The Webster.
Cleo Hauser was the subject of a post last week. To see another rooftop photo
and to learn more about Cleo, click here

The Webster Apartments for Women
419 West 34th Street
My grandmother, Edith Giddens lived at The Webster Apartments for Women in New York City from 1929 to about 1931. She must have really enjoyed living there as I remember her talking about The Webster as if it were an exclusive club. 

Charles and Josiah Webster, brothers and partners in the Macy company, saw the need of affordable apartments for unmarried working women in New York City. Charles died in 1916 and left much of his fortune to establish the apartments. Josiah was the first president of The Webster and when he died, most of his estate was willed to The Webster. 

The Webster Apartments for Women to be established.
Click here to enlarge and read the complete article from 1916.


The Webster Apartments for Women opened on November 15, 1923. The estimated cost to build the apartments was $538,000. At the time of the opening, women paid between $8.50 and $12.00 weekly for a small room and two meals a day. Grandma told my mother that there was a radio room and rooms to take beaus. There were baths on each floor, laundry rooms, a library, sewing room, and the rooftop patio. 

Miss Lillian Randall was the manager of The Webster when Grandma was living there. Read the following article about Miss Randall and learn much about The Webster in the 1920s. 


The Webster Apartments for Women - where Edith Giddens lived in NYC 1928 - 1931
Click here to enlarge and read the complete article from 1925.

The Webster Apartments for Women continues to provide rooms and meals for working women. Visit WebsterApartments.org to see photos and read about the current guidelines. The Webster Apartments Facebook Page posts weekly menus and more. 

Diana

© 2015

Sources

"$500,000 left for Women in Stores." 26 Mar 1916, Page 10 - The Sun at Newspapers.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Jul. 2015. <http://www.newspapers.com/image/?spot=2870367>.

"Ancestry.com - 1930 United States Federal Census." Ancestry.com - 1930 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jul. 2015. <http://interactive.ancestry.com/6224/4638835_00292/42241821>

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.

"It Just Couldn't Be Done - But She Did It; Miss Randall Tells How Her Plan Worked." 6 Sep 1925, Page 83 - The Brooklyn Daily Eagle at Newspapers.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Jul. 2015. <http://www.newspapers.com/image/?spot=2870338>. 

"Thirteen-Story Hotel to Cost $538,000 for Working Women." 13 Jan 1920, Page 21 - New-York Tribune at Newspapers.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Jul. 2015. <http://www.newspapers.com/image/?spot=2870380>.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

From the Files of Marguerite Cook Clark: An Obituary for Ezekiel S. Wimberly




Died: - At his home near Arcadia, La., December 29th, ’93, Mr. E. Wimberly, at the ripe old age of 72 years, one month and sixteen days. 

He was a native of Washington County, Ga. He was born Nov. 13, 1821.  He moved with his father to Louisiana in 1850, and settled near Arcadia, Bienville Parish, La., where he has resided for forty-three years. Thus giving his neighbors an opportunity to know him thoroughly.  He was married to Miss M. A. Butler in 1852, but she died August the 5th, 1860. 

After the war (in which he served with credit for two years) he was married to Mrs. G. A. F. Pittman, who survives him.  He also leaves three children, two sons and one daughter, all of whom are members of the church, and are highly respected for their high Christian character and good citizenship. Thus demonstrating the truthfulness of the Bible, “Raise up a child in the way he should go and when he is old, he will not depart from it. 

When Mr. Wimberly landed in Louisiana, his father’s family consisted of father, mother, three boys, and five girls. But alas! they have all been called from earth to heaven except one sister, who with the wife and children and a host of friends are left to ____________  his death is keenly felt by all, as he was an affectionate husband, a devoted father and a kind neighbor.  

He was strong in character, resolute in purpose, and decided in action. 

It has been the pleasure of the writer to know Mr. Wimberly intimately for thirty years, and must say that I never known a more honorable man. He came as near as doing ____________ have them to do unto himself, as any man I ever knew.  He was honest to a fault, dealing at all times fairly with his fellow man. Was always found on the side of right. ___ ___ Wimberly while living but to his memory a memoriam that his children should feel proud of indeed, for a good name is something to be prized. __ is __ more trust worth than a monument that could be erected over his grave. 

It was indeed touching to all present at the grave to see quite a number of the old family slaves gather near by and were as much affected as if they were sustained a very great loss. Indeed they were. Mr. Wimberly was ___ ____ them, not only ___ ____ ____ them, not only ____ ____ to all poor and needy ___ ____ always lending a helping hand to those who were in need. 

Mr. Wimberly died in t___   {The remaining portion of the obituary is missing.}



This may be the oldest obituary found in Marguerite Cook Clark's collection. And, one of the longest. The bottom portion of the obituary is missing - another of many reasons to take a third trip to visit this collection.

Ezekiel S. Wimberly was the son of David and Martha Wimberly.  Their relationship to other Bienville Parish Wimberly's is unknown.  In 1850, Ezekiel was living in Bienville Parish, Louisiana with his parents and some of his siblings. His father was a farmer and Ezekiel's occupation was listed as laborer. Siblings listed were Noah, Sarah, Amanda, and Elizabeth.

Ezekiel was first married to Maranda Butler on March 10, 1853 in Bienville Parish.  According to the 1870 census record, they had at least three children; Thomas, James, and Martha. James, the youngest, was born in 1858.

Ezekiel S. Wimberly married Georgia Ann Frances Bryan Pitman on November 19, 1867. Georgia Ann Frances was the daughter of my great-great-grandparents, Reddick and Elizabeth Regan Bryan. 

In 1870, Ezekiel, a farmer, and Georgia Ann Frances Wimberly were living in Bienville Parish with Ezekiel's children James, Martha, and Thomas. Also living with the family were Sarah Watts, daughter of Catherine Amanda Bryan Watts, Georgia's sister, and two young African - American children, Berry and Sam Watts.

In 1880, Ezekiel was farming and lived with his wife, Georgia Ann Frances, and son, James. On the same page of the 1880 United States census were his son, Thomas J. Wimberly and wife, Texanna Youngblood. 

Ezekiel S. Wimberly died on December 29, 1893  and is buried in the Arcadia Cemetery, in Bienville Parish, along with his first wife and and daughter, Martha Jane Wimberly McKethan.  Georgia Ann Frances Bryan Pitman Wimberly is buried in the Bryan Family Cemetery near Ringgold in Bienville Parish. 

Diana

© 2015

Sources

"Ezekiel S Wimberly in the 1850 United States Federal Census." Ezekiel S Wimberly in the 1850 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=2687867&db=1850usfedcenancestry&indiv=try>.
"Ef Wimberly in the 1870 United States Federal Census." Ef Wimberly in the 1870 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=26329863&db=1870usfedcen&indiv=try>.

"E. S. Wimberly in the 1880 United States Federal Census." E. S. Wimberly in the 1880 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=40087699&db=1880usfedcen&indiv=try>.

"Ezekiel S Wimberly in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current." Ezekiel S Wimberly in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=61588137&db=FindAGraveUS&indiv=try>.

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Marguerite Cook Clark. Accessed April 28, 2014 and September 14, 2014. Used with permission.

Head, John C. Bienville Parish, Louisiana Marriage Records, 1850-1900. Shreveport, La. (8505 Dixie Blanchard Rd., Shreveport 71107-8176): J & W Enterprises, 1990. Print.

"Texana Wimberley in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current." Texana Wimberley in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=20660284&db=FindAGraveUS&indiv=try>.

Friday, July 17, 2015

Friday's Photo: Grandma's Friend, Cleo Hauser

My grandmother, Edith Giddens, and her friend, Cleo Hauser, on the roof of the Webster.
I found these photos of Cleo Hauser in my grandmother's album. She and my grandmother, Edith Giddens, lived  in the Webster Apartments for Women in New York City from about 1928 until 1930 or 1931. 

Cleo Hauser - about 1929
Cleo was in her late 20s when she met my grandmother. Born in Iowa on April 24, 1903, she was the daughter of the Rev. Thomas N. Hauser and Bess Meyers Hauser. Cleo left family behind when she moved to NYC. Her father passed away in 1918 and her mother and brothers remained in the Midwest. 

In 1930, Cleo was working as a bookkeeper for a company in the oil industry. My grandmother worked as a clerk for a telephone company. 

I suspect that Cleo married in 1931 as a marriage between a Cleo Hauser and Emile Decelles took place in Manhattan on February 2nd of that year.  
Cleo - in front of the nurses residence


In 1938, Cleo sent my grandmother a photo and on the back is written "This snap shot was taken here at ah-gwah-ching in front of the nurses residence." Ah Gwah Ching Sanatorium was located in Cass County, Minnesota. 

In 1940, Cleo was a nurse living in Cass County, Minnesota. Her marital status was divorced. From the census, it can be seen that she lived in Marshall, Iowa in 1935. 

Cleo's obituary stated that she was a graduate of Asker Hospital Nurses School and attended Drake University.  She was an Indian field nurse at Cass Lake Indian Hospital, the State Public Health Nurse at Walker, and a public school nurse in Walker. 

It is known that Cleo married twice after leaving NYC; to Sydney M. Dyer who died in 1956 and later to William P. Mealey. 

Cleo died on April 1, 1974 and is buried in the Hauser Cemetery in Hardin County, Iowa. 

Diana

© 2015

Sources

"Ancestry.com - 1930 United States Federal Census." Ancestry.com - 1930 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jul. 2015. <http://interactive.ancestry.com/6224/4638835_00292/42241821>. 

"Ancestry.com - 1940 United States Federal Census." Ancestry.com - 1940 United States Federal Census. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jul. 2015. <http://interactive.ancestry.com/2442/m-t0627-01912-00549/98096671>.

"Ancestry.com - Pioneer (Bemidji, Minnesota)." Ancestry.com - Pioneer (Bemidji, Minnesota). N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jul. 2015. <http://interactive.ancestry.com/51870/News-MI-PI.1974_04_06-0003/>.

"Cleo Hauser in the New York, New York, Marriage Index 1866-1937." Cleo Hauser in the New York, New York, Marriage Index 1866-1937. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=4910854&db=nycmarriageindexes&indiv=1>.

"Cleo Hauser Mealey in the Minnesota, Death Index, 1908-2002." Cleo Hauser Mealey in the Minnesota, Death Index, 1908-2002. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=1727008&db=MNDeaths&indiv=try>.

"Cleo Hauser - Overview - Ancestry.com." Cleo Hauser - Overview - Ancestry.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jul. 2015. <http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/40297422/person/19475269790?ssrc=>.


Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.

"Mrs. Bess Hauser," Freeport Journal-Standard (Freeport, Illinois), 21 December 1943, p. 14, digital images, Newspapers.com: accessed 14 July, 2015.  http://www.newspapers.com/image/4457950/?terms=%22cleo%2Bhauser%22

"Sydney M Dyer in the U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963." Sydney M Dyer in the U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jul. 2015. <http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=1222250&db=qgheadstoneapps&indiv=1>.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Friday's Photo: Granddaddy's Camera

This camera was purchased by my grandmother, Edith Giddens Davis in 1929.
My grandfather, Claude Lewis Davis, used it to take the 1936 selfie in last week's post 


I wasn't going to post a Friday's Photo this week.  I am in Salt Lake City researching family. However, my mother sent me a picture of the camera used to take last week's "1936 selfie" along with a nice description. 

Thank you, Mom, for writing this week's blog post. 

This is the camera Daddy used to take his selfie.  It's a Kodak and uses 116 film. To put in the film, the whole bellows section has to be removed.  The film goes in one end of the camera and is pulled across to the other and attached to the spool there.
If I remember correctly there were usually only 12 exposures per roll.  The numbers show through a small round red window on the back when the film is advanced. The white looking lever to the left of the lens is the shutter button.  I don't know what the silver "tool" to the left of the lever is for.  The cord under the camera is an extension used to trip the shutter when the camera is not being held.  It's very short so Daddy must have attached a cord to the lever itself.  The bellows seems to be in good condition but there must be a few leaks in it somewhere.  

The last photos we took were cloudy.  I believe Mom bought it in 1929 and it has a carrying case - primitive when compared with today's modern cameras and iPhones.


Diana

© 2015

Friday, July 3, 2015

Friday's Photo: My Grandfather's 1936 Selfie


My grandfather, Claude Davis, taking a photo of himself 1936. My mother noticed the telltale string and sent me this photo, taken at the family's home on 147th Street in the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, New York.

Look at the shadow to the right. Is that the camera? 

Diana

© 2015

Family photographs and documents from the collection of Diana Bryan Quinn.